"(Neocom)muter",Paul Corman-Roberts

Neocom(muter) is the newest book of poetry by Paul Corman-Roberts, published by Tainted Coffee Press. (2009) The cover art by Andrew Lander is really the first thing that will grab you about this book: the figure on the front is confronting you, stopping you dead in your tracks. You’re being urged to take pause: Just Stop. Step away from the treadmill, life is happening while we are too busy living, as they say. And to me, that is what Corman-Roberts is talking about here but he takes it a step further. We’re not just “commuters” moving back and forth in the business of living, we are becoming so consumed with the process that we are almost detatching, not fully participating. The new kind of commuter is living to serve the rat race, not participating in the rat race so he may live. It is this difference that Corman-Roberts seems to explore, here and there in his work, but quite directly in this collection.

Cover of (neocom)muter, Andrew Lander

Cover of (neocom)muter, Andrew Lander

What’s Corman-Roberts doing here? What is he setting you up for, confronting you with?

Everything. He’s packed the world into the trunk of the Corolla, a mix of things- some pretty heavy baggage. It starts off with damage: “charred satellites”, near-misses, the fallout from choices, being products of the past.

“Beach Secrets” was a strange choice for me, in it’s placement as the second poem. It seems like a departure, with it’s ocean smell radiating like radio waves from some epicenter on the shore. The untreated sewage in the face of such a calibrated society- is he reminding us that there are still organic elements, byproducts of living, that have the power to come back at us? There’s something in the organic that often refuses to be denied, from the septic to the decomposing, life remains a part of life for the commuter. Like the figure on the cover, it will confront you on the platform. You can run, travel arrogant on your rails, but you can’t hide from truths like mortality, like stench, like “dried blood”, bitterness, like the pets that make a mess of the morning commute. (continued) Continue reading

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"Poet Laureate Of A Dirty Garage", Wayne Mason

“Poet Laureate Of A Dirty Garage” by Wayne Mason, erbacce-press, 2009.

 Wayne Mason has been lauded as a working man’s poet and that is clearly defined in this collection of poems published by erbacce-press.  Poet Laureate Of A Dirty Garage is equal parts blue collar factory man, lone writer, and side-car Buddhist.

He is at his best in the poems “Defeated On Monday Morning”, “Poet Laureate of My Garage”, “Martyrs”, and “Swing Your Pen Like A Hammer And Sickle”.  Wayne understands the essence of the common man and how hard it is to find glimmers of hope amongst the day to day plodding movements of punching the clock.  He explores the idea that his words can chip away at this monotony, but that they might not save any lives from the factory….except his own.

 

Wayne grazes over images of Buddha in this collection, but does not dig very deep though his fascination is noted.  The recurrent mention of Buddha speaks to “what if” there is something more than this continuous factory life that maybe something exists beyond the things that might make life so hard.

 

My favorite poem in this 18 poem collection is “Dreaming of Han Shan”.

 

“I was only 16

when I read the

cold mountain

poems of

Han Shan and

the simplicity

like Chinese

brush strokes

on rice paper

kicked me

in the gut

and more

than ever I

saw the truth”

 

This collection speaks for the factory worker and begins to stretch its arms out to new age ideas.  This chap by Wayne Mason can be purchased from erbacce-press by going to: www.erbacce-press.com for more details.

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Christopher Luna: Collage, Full of Crow Galleries

Christopher Luna: Collage, in Full of Crow Galleries. “Revved -Up Revisionists”

[book id='1' /]

Revved-Up Revisionists

Revved-Up Revisionists

Christopher Luna is one of the featured artists for 2009 in the Full of Crow Galleries, a virtual showcase for artists of diverse backgrounds working with mixed media and formats: mail art, collage, digital art, photography, vispo, graphic art.

Luna’s art shares elements with his poetry: pop culture icons, the juxtaposition of text and celebrities and symbols and at times- some pretty unlikely combinations that intrigue and perplex.

A follower of his art and poetry would recognize immediately that he returns in these pieces, as always, to the role of observer and recorder, witness and messenger through positioning and context. Consider Spacious Interior: Two figures are facing the couple, observing them. Two faces, perhaps perceiving the couple in different ways. They are different faces, in scale and presentation. They both face the couple- what are they saying about space, about relationships, about intimacy and the ways people can be close, yet maintain boundaries in their spaces? The larger face looks down, looming with glasses, almost to evoke the silent observer of The Great Gatsby in the Wasteland scenery, who serves as an omniscient-type critic.(Continued) Continue reading

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"Acres", Bill Shute

Acres” by Bill Shute, Kendra Steiner Editions, #131, 2009.

What have we become? If observing the industrial minicosm of Bill Shute’s Acres can tell us anything, it’s that we are increasingly a society as he concludes: without ideas, only things.

And so he takes us through a setting of things: buildings with their smoky windows, paradoxical images, elements of nature and industry where natural stones have been unnaturally chiseled into angular structures of utility. Three old oaks are contained in this development, as though their natural context could be chiseled and contrived as well, in a median surrounded by pavement.

Steel poles with their boxy light fixtures (again, angular) challenge the claims of the old oaks, rivals in the vertical spaces. They are as towers contrived not by the needs of nature and biology, but rising from the plans of civilization.

In these acres, the landscape is reconfigured, and ironically the speaker is observing a space where what is natural is out of place: walking instead of driving? Only if there’s a compelling reason. Nature itself is reduced to a design element. Is he such an element? Where does he fit in?

This book is a short read, it aims to present a series of observations but trusts the reader’s ability to draw conclusions without overtly preaching or doling out judgment with a heavy pen. We can infer certain things, particularly about social stratification and this idea of “other” that is explored in both the natural versus industrial comparison, and in the physical barriers. Shute’s acres are stratified: gated communities, neighborhoods and buildings that are off limits, pedestrians versus drivers, participants and observers. Perhaps the message hits home here: where food is “eaten by those family members able to make it”.

What is he saying about progress, and the table that is our collective largess, our bounty? The speaker is of the space, but apart from the space, aligned with the outsider, the pedestrian. The speaker is aligned with the oaks in the median, the carved hills, the absent.

“Acres”, Bill Shute. Kendra Steiner Editions, # 131. 2009

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"Point Loma Purple", Bill Shute

Bill Shute: “Point Loma Purple: The Life And Work of Katherine Tingley, An Imagined History in Mosaic Verse” . Poetry. 2007. Word Mechanics.

This 2007 volume by Bill Shute is a work to revisit. He achieves something very magical in Point Loma Purple, but keeps it accessible: he tells us a story.
In these “mosaic verses”, we find his themes arranged, such that their context changes depending on where the observer stands in relation to the work. Verses, beset by Shute’s purposeful spacing, are as tiles suspended on a grouted plane, where divinity looms perpendicular to an earth observed.

There are many things to love about “Point Loma Purple” found in Shute’s social and spiritual connections, playing out in a “neo-narrative” of Katherine Tingley. (“Neo-narrative”, in that he has essentially recreated her story as an “imagined story”, interpreted,based on the public record)

But why? Why has he chosen her life, her contributions? We know Shute uses language to link domains. From symbols to architecture, he connects humans with their elements (myopic or even absurd, when he’s in a critical mode) and then pushes back, humans falling back into a periphery. He takes the reader from what is individual to what is universal-moving in and then slowly zooming out. It seems fitting that he would choose a subject so connected historically to a movement of spiritual oneness in the face of diverse pluralities. Just as Shute’s “Acres” explores society in the industrial park minicosm, Tingley is an exploration of the individual in relation to everything beyond the fingertips.
We are introduced to Katherine, (then, Catherine) in “A Dream, A Seed” and Shute sets the scene, first highlighting elements of the physical realm: trees, forms, colors, perfume- then connecting them inextricably to an inner mindscape to serve as a place of anchor in upcoming transitions of both chronology and style: from earthly to ethereal, from the ontological to the soulful, human to social, youth to adulthood- for example,returning to the younger Katherine and the Chinese teapot. In these scenes, Shute draws at times from the accounts of Tingley herself, such as in “The Splendor of the Soul”. It is through translation into Shute’s own language and cadence that we, as readers, are treated to a remarkable piece of writing. (continued)

Who was Katherine Tingley? Tingley was a turn of the century theosophist, and like Shute’s tiles of “mosaic verse”, the members of the Theosophical Society advanced a position of collected truths: an assemblage of elements, forward moving and evolving truths from diverse religious perspectives that again, like a mosaic, present an aggregate truth that is universal and overarching. It is, in a sense, a summation of parts, like an organism: one life, in “radical unity”. Truth, “Speaking through every culture.” (“A Dream, A Seed”)

Was it Shute’s intention to “micro-morphize” Tingley as an embodiment of sorts, into this organism, bringing lofty ideas within range, into something palpable?

What we learn about as we read about Tingley goes beyond the idea of reflecting on the self in relation to a higher consciousness or interconnected design, into the idea of working purpose and life examined. “Deliberacy”: breaking “the chain of empty habit”.
We watch her movements from escape to reinvention, actor to activist, becoming a public personality subject to both wrath and admiration. We see suspicion: of a woman, of a rival, of an innovator, of a person whose message was often misunderstood or feared. We see criticism- Point Loma as “bourgeoisie”.

Tingley’s story is about a certain essential imperative, reflected in the examples of charitable and social work:
In “Bridge Building”:

“Not concerned about receiving, practicing the
Law of duty. She didn’t think about trying to achieve
These goals- she was too busy living them…”

“…each man is a Soul; each Soul
Must have chance to evolve; and those who have gone
So far astray are in greatest need of the Light.”

In Book Two: Being and Becoming, we see Tingley’s story connected to these questions of mission and purpose. Enter the Theosophical Society, and soon- her ascent and the spread of “theosophy for the masses.” (“The Woman In The Wilderness”)
By the time Tingley gets to Point Loma, she is clear on the need to connect work with purpose toward “divine life”, mission, service, “casting pebbles in the pool of humanity” (“Punta de la Loma”)
Reaching out and refining the message, she turns her attention to the establishment of the Raja-Yoga School: “the melting together of beauty and education” (“The Raja-Yoga Mustard Seed”) and “The New Way”, a publication intended for inmate populations. (karma, transformation, reincarnation, and transcendence.)
At its core, this book is a tribute to the “Purple Mother”: purple, the color of “royalty” and “womandom”. (“The Path, The Potholes”) It is a tribute to Katherine Tingley’s legacy and Shute makes the case – eloquently and skillfully- for understanding and appreciating this legacy.

* * *

About The Book

Point Loma Purple: The Life And Work Of Katherine Tingley (1847-1929)

An Imagined History In Mosaic Verse

A 3200+ line book-length poem in 18 chapters, paralleling the 18 sections of the Bhagavad-Gita.

Bill Shute, 2007

Published by Word Mechanics

Palm Springs, California

Find more titles by Bill Shute at Kendra Steiner Editions.

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Crow Reviews

This is the Review Section for Full of Crow, edited by Aleathia Drehmer and Lynn Alexander.

We review independent titles and small press publications, as well as self-published work. We hope to incorporate some of our knowledge of the authors, their approach and methods, and bring something different to our reviews in that we want to go past an attempt to judge quality. We are looking to describe work, explore a specific aspect of work, talk about context or what an author was trying to achieve. We want to talk about the work, but also the writing of the work.

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AleathiaDrehmer@fullofcrow.com

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